Welcome! This blog contains research & information on lifestyle, nutrition and health for those with MS, as well as continuing information on the understanding of CCSVI and cerebral hypoperfusion. This blog is informative only--all medical decisions should be discussed with your own physicians.

The posts are searchable---simply type in your topic of interest in the search box at the top left.

Almost all of MS research is initiated and funded by pharmaceutical companies. This maintains the EAE mouse model and the immune paradigm of MS, and continues the 20 billion dollar a year MS treatment industry. But as we learn more about slowed blood flow, gray matter atrophy, and environmental links to MS progression and disability--all things the current drugs do not address--we're discovering more about how to help those with MS.

To learn how this journey began, read my first post from August, 2009. Be well! Joan

Monday, August 8, 2016

CCSVI included in Oxford Textbook of Vascular Surgery

"The Oxford Textbook series is the foremost international textbook of medicine. Unrivalled in its coverage of the scientific aspects and clinical practice of medicine and its subspecialties, it is a fixture in the offices and wards of physicians around the world."

The new edition of the Oxford Textbook of Vascular Surgery, edited by Matthew M. Thompson, professor of vascular surgery at St. George's Medical School in London, includes articles from "130 global experts."  The new edition features a full chapter on Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI).  Authored by Dr. Paolo Zamboni, Sergio Gianesini and Erica Menegatti from the University of Ferrara, this chapter is included in a section on diseases of veins and lymphatics.  link

While MS specialists and neuroimmunologists have disparaged and intentionally misrepresented Dr. Paolo Zamboni's vascular studies, he has continued to publish, undaunted.  He, along with the International Society of Neurovascular Disease,  have explored how the venous system affects neurodegenerative disease.  He has improved cerebral venous return using open surgery and venoplasty, and has documented benefits in the health of his patients.  He has created a brand new CCSVI diagnostic center at the University of Ferrara, while collaborating with international space organizations, to understand the affects of microgravity on the venous system.  As I have said before, if rocket scientists collaborate with Dr. Zamboni, why can't MS neurologists?  If the Oxford Textbook editors consider his research expert and important enough to include in this new publication, why the continued naysaying from neurology?

Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Paolo Zamboni and the entire vascular department at the University of Ferrara.  Thank you for continuing your research and exploration, even while confronted with unprecedented hysteria and vitriol from the neurological community.

CCSVI exists.  Slowed venous return to the heart harms the central nervous system, just as slowed venous return harms every other major organ in the human body.   This is scientific fact.  Whether or not MS specialists choose to acknowledge the science remains a moot point.  Vascular specialists understand this, and will continue to treat patients and push the research forward.  This is how medical science evolves, one peer-reviewed publication at a time, until the stack becomes undeniable.  Financial incentives, pharmaceutical payouts,  cognitive dissonance, and territorial medical silos cannot stop it.

Share this information with vascular specialists at your local universities and hospitals.  Fund research and support groups like the ISNVD.  Insist that "charities" and organizations who purport to be helping people with MS include vascular specialists on their medical advisory boards.  Question the status quo.

And most importantly, do all you can to improve your own heart and endothelial health.  Because this is real-- the heart and brain are connected-- and there are things you can do today to help yourself.  No prescription necessary.

Be well,
Joan







7 comments:

  1. Can a MS-patient find a vascular surgeon who dare to make an veinoperation on a MS-patient?

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    1. I did, by contacting vascular specialists at local universities in my home state. I e-mailed 5 vascular specialists/IRs who were well-respected and asked them to read Dr. Zamboni's published research. Two of them responded with interest, we chose one who tested and eventually treated Jeff. It means pulling together the research, writing to physicians, and following up with them. It is doable. Especially now that his research is included in the Oxford textbook and has many more publications in support. Good luck, Per!

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  2. Thank you for sharing Joan from me here in UK.Wishes that our UK NHS would help us. I have contacted one university here in my hometown what I can say is we are way too slow in UK at picking up on CCSVI and I try endlessly to get us noticed here .

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    1. Thank YOU for contacting your local university, and for continuing to spread the information, Lynne. We'll just keep on sharing the research and hope for better days ahead!

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    2. Joan no one is taking any notice of me dispite lots being sent to them !

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  3. No money for the drug companies means no interest to powers that be. I am proof it works, no one in authority interested, we have to do it for ourselves.

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    1. Couldn't agree more, Philip! Good for you for finding your own path to healing. Keep moving, stay positive, eat well and enjoy your life. all best, Joan

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